FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

Jensen Loudspeakers

Musician's Friend

Guitar Center

Amazon

WD Music

Antique Electronics Supply

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

MOD KITS DIY

Amplified Parts

Sweetwater

Apex Tube Matching


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / Miscellaneous and Non-Fender Topics / Painting over an existing finish

Rick Knight
Contributing Member
**********
********

St Peters, MO USA

Standing in the back, by the drummer.
Sep 1st, 2017 01:43 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Would changing a clear finish to Butterscotch Blonde be as simple as a bit of fine sandpaper and a can or two of ReRanch, or is there more to it than that?

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
******

Activity does not

always equal achievement
Sep 1st, 2017 02:36 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

It's doable, but there are some considerations:

-If the existing finish is nitro, yes...and

-Butterscotch blonde is a translucent (partially opaque) finish. These can be tricky.

Laying on the coats is an art, because you want to see some of the wood grain through the finish. if you lay it on too thick, if becomes completely opaque and you lose the wood grain.

And if you wet-sand too heavily, you remove too much finish.

It can all result in a blotchy appearance.

So the best approach is to do multiple *super light* coats of the butterscotch until you achieve the translucency you want with no blotchiness.

Follow that with 6-8 coats of clear before you let it rest, and then start your wet sanding, with light clear coats between.

That way you are leveling clear finish, not the translucent finish. It preserves the look you're going for.



Rick Knight
Contributing Member
**********
********

St Peters, MO USA

Standing in the back, by the drummer.
Sep 1st, 2017 03:06 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Thanks, Peegoo. I appreciate the information. Patience, delicacy and moderation are not commonly attributed to me. This might be too advanced for my first attempt at refinishing.

Standard24

San Antonio, Texas

Sep 1st, 2017 03:22 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Here's an example of a crappy cover-up job, over vintage white. this was a very quick job with spray paint from Walmart.

Crappy spray can job...

(This message was last edited by Standard24 at 05:23 PM, Sep 1st, 2017)

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
******

Activity does not

always equal achievement
Sep 1st, 2017 06:44 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

That looks GREAT, Standard24!

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
******

Activity does not

always equal achievement
Sep 1st, 2017 06:56 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Rick, even if you're not super experienced with this stuff, you can get great results.

There are a few "must do's" when using spray equipment or aerosol spray paint:

Prep is *everything*. A smooth, clean surface helps guarantee a smooth, perfect finish.

Make sure it's mixed well (shake shake shake); then when it's all shook up, shake it for another two minutes.

Spray when the humidity is low and the temperature is between 60 and 80 degrees F. If the paint is cold, set it in a bucket of warm water.

Use a jig or "dummy neck" (e.g., 24" section of broomstick, etc.) to use as a handle when applying the spray finish.

Keep the spray head between 6" and 10" from the work.

Spray the guitar body while it's hanging vertically. Spray horizontally, and you risk dropping a blob of paint on the work (just like what happens at 1:40 in the linked vid, which is a pretty good overview).

Start and stop each spray pass off the work. This prevents spits and spats of color on the work.

Several light coats are better than fewer heavy coats.

Here are some tips.

Rick Knight
Contributing Member
**********
********

St Peters, MO USA

Standing in the back, by the drummer.
Sep 2nd, 2017 06:04 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"That looks GREAT, Standard24!"

+1

FDP Forum / Miscellaneous and Non-Fender Topics / Painting over an existing finish




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2017 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved