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FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / Getting a handle on it (hammer time)

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Peegoo
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Tried vegetarian:

miss steak.
Jan 11th, 2018 09:53 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

There is something very satisfying about re-hanging an axe, hatchet, or hammer.

I've had a Bob Hart California Framer for many years. It has built houses, barns, walls, sheds, decks, and docks. It easily sinks a 16d coated nail in two hits.

Many in the business consider these Harts the best hammers in the world. A real-deal original like this one is quite collectible and surprisingly expensive. Modern Hart hammers, however are not related to the original company other than name only.

This hammer doesn't get much heavy use these days, but the handle was a bit loose and chewed up a little. I didn't have any hickory or ash in the size I needed for a new handle, so I copped out and ordered one from The Hammerman in CA. The only drawback is I can't hand-pick it for grain orientation.

While I awaited delivery of the new handle, I removed the old handle and reconditioned the head. It wasn't too beaten up. It's solid stainless steel, so I was able to polish everything out, and I brought back the mashed waffle face with a triangle file.

The new handle needed some shaping to fit. It was also coated with varnish, so I removed it and applied linseed oil. If you're unaware, varnish on a hammer, hatchet, or axe handle will cause blisters on the hands; oiled wood does not. Grain orientation wasn't perfect, but the USFS says anything up to 45 degrees off is acceptable for a striking tool. This handle is about 30 degrees off, so it's good.

I made a poplar wedge for the kerf and used the two original round Hart steel wedges over that to secure the head, and filed & sanded the top smooth. One more rubdown with linseed oil and it is ready to go. It came out so good, I don't want to bang it up again :o(

You can work a lot longer with less fatigue using a wood-handled hammer. Steel and Fiberglas handles transfer impact shock through the hand, wrists, and elbow, even when they have a rubberized grip. Wood is really forgiving and ultra durable.

-Added some pics

Maybe I'll leave it on my coffee table and use it for walnuts and pecans.

(This message was last edited by Peegoo at 11:58 PM, Jan 11th, 2018)

Pinetree
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(with many stars)

NW Pennsylvania

Jan 11th, 2018 09:58 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I was at Walmart today, and then out of the corner of my eye I see this display for this 3M picture hanging sticky stuff... And there he was... MC Hammer.


The tagline said Stop, Hammer Time.

Oh how the mighty have fallen.







Sorry.


Peegoo
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Tried vegetarian:

miss steak.
Jan 11th, 2018 10:00 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I hope you bought yourself some baggy poopypants while you were there!

such like...

(This message was last edited by Peegoo at 12:35 AM, Jan 12th, 2018)

Ragtop
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The older the violin

the sweeter the music.
Jan 12th, 2018 05:08 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

That hammer is a work of art, Peegoo.

Very nice!

Leftee
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VA

Life makes a man tired.
Jan 12th, 2018 05:17 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

You’re doing some cool projects during your sabbatical. Very nice indeed!

Pinetree
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NW Pennsylvania

Jan 12th, 2018 07:33 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

That's definitely too nice to use it to pound things with now.



Stratmanx
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Memphis, TN

Jan 12th, 2018 07:36 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Earth Abides !

"During his research in the American River Canyon, Ish finds an old single-jack miner’s hammer. It gives him a sense of security, so he carries it with him throughout the novel.

By the end of the book, the Hammer of Ish has become the most revered object the tribe possesses. They insist that Ish must pass it on when he dies. The person who receives the Hammer will become almost god-like – as Ish does, in the latter pages of the novel.


The Hammer of Ish is one of the great symbols in literature. And it’s a quintessentially American symbol, designed for common tasks by the Common Man – but it can also be used to find and mine gold.

(This message was last edited by Stratmanx at 09:46 AM, Jan 12th, 2018)

NoSoapRadio
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Mass., Amerika

CO2 ... is there anything it can't do?
Jan 12th, 2018 08:29 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

That's a beauty Peegoo. Nice work.

Ragtop
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The older the violin

the sweeter the music.
Jan 12th, 2018 09:01 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

And Ish uses the hammer to carve the number of the new year in the rock as each year begins.


Great book, Stratmanx. I just bought a hardback copy to replace my ancient paperback from HS. That old one is printed in about #1 font and I'm tired of busting my eyeballs trying to read it.

vomer
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Broke Down

in the Brassicas
Jan 12th, 2018 10:56 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Good to see an old tool still has value. And the hammer's neat as well ;-)

But seriously, yes, it's great to see something looked after and not just dumped, these days. I didn't know that about wood shock absorbing better, useful to know. And a very nice job.

Hammond101
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So. Cal. USA

Jan 12th, 2018 11:03 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Very nice work as usual sir. I have a Hart hammer framer I bought new in '91 to build my patio cover. Not sure if it is a coveted model. I sure like it though.

Peegoo
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Tried vegetarian:

miss steak.
Jan 12th, 2018 12:23 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Cheers, y'all.

I rarely read fiction, but I read Earth Abides a few years ago and I enjoyed it. Great story.

A Hart from the 90s is collectible. Bob still had the company then; the Huntington Beach ("HB") Tool Company was his distributor. From what I've read, he sold the company name around 2001 or so to the Masdaam/Dead-On Tool Co., and later sold to Douglas, which is no longer. Modern Harts are made overseas, I think.

Many frame carpenters these days use hammers by Dalluge, Estwing, Stiletto, Martinez, and Vaughan. But the air nail gun has taken over and does most driving of nails because production time = money.

You can get hammers made of titanium that are light in weight (19 oz. or so), but they still drive nails well because less weight means more head speed on the swing. They are not cheap.

Estwing is a popular brand; they are virtually indestructible due to the solid steel handle and Nylon overmolded handle, and they are not expensive. I have two of these for driving steel bolts and pins, because banging on bolts and rebar will destroy the waffles on a framing hammer. You have to try really hard to break an Estwing. The steel in modern Estwings is not as good as the older stuff; it'sa little softer. Find an old one at a garage sale and you have a good one.

The Vaughan California Framer is a surprisingly good hammer: wood handle, quality steel that's waffled or not, perfectly balanced, and made in the USA. Some models have a neomag nail starter in the head for those high spots. Homeless Despot sells them for around $30 or so. The steel is not finished like a Hart though; the forging marks in the unsanded areas are left in and heavily painted/varnished to smooth out the rough surface. But it's a really fine hammer for twice the price. I have one of these for those times I recruit someone to assist me. It's like a sit-in guitar :o)

The Vaughan may go into my belt to keep this Hart in pristine condition.

The Vaughan version

Taildragger
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USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
Jan 12th, 2018 01:24 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

*involuntarily adds MC Hammer harem pants to the image of Peegoo wearing a teased, blonde wig and pearl lipstick and, again, winces*

tahitijack
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San Clemente, CA

Happy Sunsets, tahitijack
Jan 12th, 2018 02:47 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Wow, thanks for posting a memory.

I grew up with Bob "Bobby" Hart. We lived on quiet little street in Lynwood, CA, but his dad changed jobs and he moved away the summer before high school. I remember us sitting on his porch talking as the movers loaded out furniture and boxes. We connected over the years. Pretty cool dude. Our neighborhood gang included a woman that went on to fame as a Playboy centerfold and another young lady became the model for Hanes pantyhose. The rest of us did pretty good and pretty good is pretty good. Not a Pat Conroy story there but it was good times.

(This message was last edited by tahitijack at 05:04 PM, Jan 12th, 2018)

Peegoo
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Tried vegetarian:

miss steak.
Jan 12th, 2018 04:19 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

tahitijack, that is COOL.

"Our neighborhood gang included a woman that went on to fame as a Playboy centerfold..."

I'll bet she was a hammer.

SHWING!

tahitijack
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San Clemente, CA

Happy Sunsets, tahitijack
Jan 13th, 2018 10:14 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Dang Peegoo you never miss a word play. Yes, she was. Unfortunately she was a bit older than the rest of us boys.

Taildragger
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USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
Jan 13th, 2018 04:52 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Man, you really beautifulized that suckah, Mr. 'Goo.

Peegoo
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Tried vegetarian:

miss steak.
Jan 13th, 2018 05:19 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Thanks TD. These things when new looked like tools made for surgeons, not carpenters.

They were beautiful and perfect for the job they were designed to do. Functional art.

The engineer's creed is something like, "design everything out that it doesn't need," which is an extension of something Einstein said: "Make it simple--but don't simplify it."

One from the mid-80s, with the magnetic nail setter and sandblasted HB logo

henrycat
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Ch'town, PEI, Canada

He said he was a wit. He was half right.
Jan 15th, 2018 08:24 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Great "refresh" job. That's a real beauty of a hammer.

At the other end of the spectrum.....I have this hundred year old American hammer in it's "as used" condition.

Plumb Hammer

(This message was last edited by henrycat at 10:26 PM, Jan 15th, 2018)

Peegoo
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Tried vegetarian:

miss steak.
Jan 15th, 2018 08:46 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

That is a beaut! Most of my hand tools are pretty old like that. The quality off the steel is a lot better than the modern stuff.

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FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / Getting a handle on it (hammer time)




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