FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

WD Music

Advertise here

MOD KITS DIY

Musician's Friend

Apex Tube Matching

Jensen Loudspeakers

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

Sweetwater

Amplified Parts

Antique Electronics Supply

Guitar Center


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / Fender Guitars: Stratocasters / American Standard string tension

jonnyblooz
Contributing Member
**********
**********
****

Asheville, NC

Enlightening the world, 1 post at a time
Apr 15th, 2018 05:11 PM   Edit   Profile  

I just bought a 94 American standard strat, and I have a 93 that I've had for many years. Having the 2nd USA has confirmed what I always felt about the first one:

Why does it seem that the USA's seem to have way more string tension than MIJ, MIM?

I have three MIJ reissues, a MIM standard and to MIM standard teles. For whatever reason, the USA and now my new USA always is tighter feeling to play when using the same basic setup and same strings.

Now my MIJ's have the vintage radius, and the MIMs have the 9.5 but smaller frets. Other than that, I can't really come up with a reason that there would be a big difference.

Maybe just the radius and fret size combination makes that big of a difference. It's not a huge deal, but it takes some time to get adjusted to when switching guitars. I don't want to step down in string gauge so I'll just live with it.

Leftee
Contributing Member
**********
**********
********

VA

Apr 15th, 2018 05:40 PM   Edit   Profile  

It is a different trem on the AmStd. That would be my guess.

(This message was last edited by Leftee at 07:43 PM, Apr 15th, 2018)

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Apr 15th, 2018 05:45 PM   Edit   Profile  

I presume they're both vibrato bridge, not hard tail.
The only thing I can suggest is, if the bridges are set to floating, the vibrato springs may have different tensions between the two guitars.

My previous guitar teacher had a John Mayer strat that was the hardest playing strat I'd ever played.
I got him to deck the bridge and it played so much easier that it moved to his #1.

As far as radius goes, I don't believe (though I've been wrong before) it will effect string tension *but* different radii can have a different feel and therefore present a *perceived* change in difficulty or ease in playability. (maybe???)

That's all I got...


Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
*

Get ready for the

Buena Buena
Apr 15th, 2018 06:24 PM   Edit   Profile  

That is exactly right, Mick.

If you have two guitars with identical scale lengths and identical string brands/gauges, the strings' tension will be identical on both guitars when the strings are at rest.

However, the differences between the two guitars, no matter how small, will affect the feel of the strings.

Fret height, string height off the frets, and the specific springs on the vibrato (there are harder & softer ones) all affect the feel of the strings and create the perception that the tension is different.


jonnyblooz
Contributing Member
**********
**********
****

Asheville, NC

Enlightening the world, 1 post at a time
Apr 15th, 2018 07:29 PM   Edit   Profile  

All of the things y'all mention are true, and I know are pretty common sense, but I always thought it a bit strange that it seems consistent with the American ones.

However, those happen to be the only ones I don't lock down the term on. I would have thought the float would leave less tension, but the opposite may just be true since the springs are pulling against it vs. being stationary.



Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Apr 15th, 2018 07:30 PM   Edit   Profile  

Yes, the string tension will be the same and, if the trem and trem block geometry are the same, the pull exerted by the trem springs will be the same.

HOWEVER, the spring *rate* of the trem springs can be different, and that will strongly affect the feel. If the MIJ Strat has "softer" springs (more springs, thinner wire gauge, larger coil diameter, more turns, or any combination of same), the trem will have a softer feel both in using the wiggle stick and in string bending.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
*

Get ready for the

Buena Buena
Apr 15th, 2018 09:09 PM   Edit   Profile  

That's why some folks like five springs, three springs, etc.

I've even seen players that liked two springs.

It has a marked affect on the feel of the strings and the bar.

jonnyblooz
Contributing Member
**********
**********
****

Asheville, NC

Enlightening the world, 1 post at a time
Apr 16th, 2018 01:12 PM   Edit   Profile  

I'm all about 3 springs as long as its floating. Five springs locked and blocked otherwise

Hammond101
Contributing Member
**********
**

So. Cal. USA

Apr 16th, 2018 02:01 PM   Edit   Profile  

Another thing about lighter vibrato springs is that although it may feel easier to bend a string, you will have to move the string farther to achieve the same change in pitch. This changes the feel or perceived feel of string tension.

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Apr 16th, 2018 04:01 PM   Edit   Profile  

"...you will have to move the string farther to achieve the same change in pitch."

This was exactly the issue with that JM strat I mentioned above. You had to chase the pitch and it really made you work for it.


Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
*

Get ready for the

Buena Buena
Apr 16th, 2018 05:13 PM   Edit   Profile  

And because science, any pitch you bend to will have exactly the same tension on the two different (but same scale length) guitars.

If you've ever played a Steinberger with the vibrato locked, you discover that you have to push a string a little more than half the distance to achieve a bent note--compared to a typical electric guitar. The reason is the extremely short lengths of string behind the nut and behind the bridge saddles.

Double-ball-end strings on these.

Leftee
Contributing Member
**********
**********
********

VA

Apr 16th, 2018 05:28 PM   Edit   Profile  

I had a Hohner Steinberger copy back in the ‘80s. It was an awesome guitar.

FDP Forum / Fender Guitars: Stratocasters / American Standard string tension




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2018 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved