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FDP Forum / Fender Bass Guitars and Bass Amps / Is it possible to run a straight and a delayed signal through the same amp

windmill
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Australia

older,better
Apr 26th, 2018 01:54 AM   Edit   Profile  

Hello

Having had one of guitar players miss a couple practices recently Have been pondering how to "fatten" up my bass sound.

So my latest idea is yo use a very short delay along with the original signal. This is commonly used in recording to fatten up guitar sounds.

So the question is can it be done with one amp ?

Are there delay pedals which allow the mixing of the straight and delayed signals ?

Or running the bass signal into an AB box with one output going to a delay pedal then to a Y box with the straight signal going to the other input of the Y box and thence to the amp.

I am overthinking this ?

just asking for a friend :)

Peegoo
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Get ready for the

Buena Buena
Apr 26th, 2018 04:33 AM   Edit   Profile  

Just about every delay pedal has a control knob that allows you to control the ratio of dry (straight) and wet (delayed) signal in a mono output that you send to the amp.

Another trick engineers do to fatten up a bass is add a mild flange and set the regeneration speed at or near zero. This creates 'space' in the signal and widens the sound.

Taildragger
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USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
Apr 26th, 2018 10:14 AM   Edit   Profile  

What Peegoo said.

But you can also separate effects by running them through two amps simultaneously. I do this to avoid losing bottom end when using OD/distortion. One amp gets the OD signal while another one stays clean to leave the low-frequencies intact.

Some high-quality A/B or A,B/Y pedals will completely isolate the signals.

The Lehle Little Dual, for example:

Peegoo
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Get ready for the

Buena Buena
Apr 26th, 2018 10:55 AM   Edit   Profile  

Using a delay on guitars to broaden the sound is different from using a delay on bass.

Most music requires a punchy bass tone, and a delay on the signal can make it lose definition because it dilutes the 'rhythm instrument' aspect of the bass sound.

You would probably need to adjust the delay to match each song's tempo in order to keep the bass from becoming more of a wash of sound in the mix.

Depending on how you play, compression can make your bass sound constrained and mechanical in a mix. If you're looking to add more dynamics and "air" in your sound, try playing with very little or no compression.

Another thing that's done to fatten up a bass track is to add a mild distortion or mild fuzz.

themaestro
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Wichita, Kansas

Drums = pulse, Bass = heartbeat
Apr 26th, 2018 01:25 PM   Edit   Profile  

Generally, delays and reverbs don't play well with bass frequencies. Things turn to mud very quickly and room reverberation just makes it worse.

If you listen to pro recordings, there is often delay/reverb on all the instruments except the bass, which is almost always dry in the mix.

I agree with Peegoo that a little dirt is a good way to fatten up a bass sound.

Taildragger
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USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
Apr 26th, 2018 01:50 PM   Edit   Profile  

"Using a delay on guitars to broaden the sound is different from using a delay on bass."

Agreed: I originally bought my Carbon Copy for use with guitar and only use just the tiniest bit (low settings) with bass. Probably wouldn't even have bothered to add it to the bass board had I not already owned one.

rwb

Canada

The Plankster of Love
May 1st, 2018 04:57 PM   Edit   Profile  

If all we're talking about is recording, try mic on the cabinet, and delay that to the direct signal a very small amount, like 5 ms. Thick as borscht.

Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
May 2nd, 2018 10:47 AM   Edit   Profile  

Adding a tic-tac bass is another way to thicken up a bass without muddying up the sound. If anything, it makes it crisper. But it does involve recording another track.

rwb

Canada

The Plankster of Love
May 6th, 2018 12:48 AM   Edit   Profile  

Wow, I haven't heard the term "tic-tac" bass in a long long time. Do you actually know of modern day usage of it? I remember the term being used specifically to refer to the doubling of a six-string bass (i.e. Danelectro or Fender Bass VI) over top of an upright bass track. As well it could mean a doubling of a muted, picked bass guitar line over a Fender bass line played with fingers to get the deeper sound.


Taildragger
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USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
May 6th, 2018 09:21 AM   Edit   Profile  

"Adding a tic-tac bass is another way to thicken up a bass without muddying up the sound."

...with the added bonus of fresher breath.

Peegoo
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Always

trust your cape
May 15th, 2018 02:26 PM   Edit   Profile  

Especially if the bass is in mint condition.

Taildragger
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USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
May 15th, 2018 05:50 PM   Edit   Profile  

;-P

FDP Forum / Fender Bass Guitars and Bass Amps / Is it possible to run a straight and a delayed signal through the same amp




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