FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

Guitar Center

Jensen Loudspeakers

WD Music

Apex Tube Matching

MOD KITS DIY

Advertise here

Antique Electronics Supply

Sweetwater

Musician's Friend

Amplified Parts


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / re advice w/ first time soldering (pickups/ pots)

Previous 20 Messages  
damuniz
Contributing Member
**********
***

South Jersey/USA

She turned me into a newt!....
May 21st, 2018 07:39 AM   Edit   Profile  

I would suggest using a brass scrub sponge instead of a wet sponge when cleaning the tip. The wet sponge causes the tip to cool down. The tip stays hot using the brass scrubber.

I also agree the soldering sticks are better than a gun.

All other advice on this thread is spot on.

wrnchbndr

New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
May 21st, 2018 07:53 AM   Edit   Profile  

All of these things are an investment. I routinely use both 3/32" solder wick and a solder sucker. The brass scrub sponge is an essential thing for me too but in a pinch I just use my blue jeans -- the quick swipe doesn't burn my leg. ...so far

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
*

A dog

in a cake shop
May 21st, 2018 09:27 AM   Edit   Profile  

"Mark, that's a weird tattoo on your kneecap."

"Um, actually, I sometimes forget I'm wearing shorts when I'm soldering, and..."

(This message was last edited by Peegoo at 11:29 AM, May 21st, 2018)

juliocesar

USA/ Miami, Florida

Jun 12th, 2018 08:04 PM   Edit   Profile  

Well, thanks again to all who were kind enough to contribute with their thoughts and advice on this topic.

The good news: I did it! I followed (most) of the advice and got everything done. I attached new pickups to a new pickguard and got all of that situated into the guitar... I only ran into one problem:

a) when I roll the 1st (neck) tone knob all the way down, it cuts out the volume

Now, I did a few searches to see re this issue and only found it covered in a small handful of places, and nowhere decisively (at least it didn't appear so). So I am hear again to ask a new question: what's the fix?

I am attaching a pic of the work I did... and thanks again to all who may be able to help.

https://imgur.com/pvk8LUJ

https://imgur.com/Qp53DMI

*apologies that I do not know how to hyperlink the above photos; in order to view them, you will have to copy the address to a browser

**fix found: turns out that if the cap is situated between the pots, it will cut volume when tone is lowered... the way to avoid this is for one line from the cap to run between the pots and then the other line to run direct to ground.

(This message was last edited by juliocesar at 12:06 AM, Jun 13th, 2018)

juliocesar

USA/ Miami, Florida

Jun 12th, 2018 08:17 PM   Edit   Profile  

One more thing to add to the above: I wired for neck/ 1st tone knob and bridge/ 2nd tone knob. That leaves an open middle and a shared capacitor between neck and bridge (1st and 2nd) tone pots (as I write this, it is dawning on me that the open middle does not appear to be benefiting from the capacitor... this is an aside from the intent of the above post, but: is this the case and is there a way for all three pups to benefit from the capacitor even when one (the middle) is open?

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
*

Ooo that sandwich

is gonna get et
Jun 13th, 2018 05:29 AM   Edit   Profile  

That looks like pretty good work! Nice job.

Glad you found the reason why the tone control was cutting the signal.

I don't understand your question in your second post.



Edited...after some thought:

I don't know what you mean by "benefit." The capacitor adds nothing to a pickup's signal. It subtracts from the signal.

It acts as a variable low-pass filter when combined with a pot. With the tone pot at 10, the cap is electrically removed from the signal chain.

As you roll back the tone pot, the cap is gradually added into the circuit, which progressively drains highs in the signal to ground.

(This message was last edited by Peegoo at 08:26 AM, Jun 13th, 2018)

Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Jun 13th, 2018 09:31 AM   Edit   Profile  

"...With the tone pot at 10, the cap is electrically removed from the signal chain..."

Not quite. With the tone pot at 10, the capacitor is still in the signal chain, but the signal has to go through a large resistor value before it gets to the cap, so very little signal gets through. If you really want the cap completely out of the circuit, you need to use a no-load pot on the tone control.

juliocesar, in your last post I believe what you're asking is how to have the tone control active when just the middle pickup is selected? If you could link us to the wiring diagram you used, we could tell you what modifications are possible.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
*

Ooo that sandwich

is gonna get et
Jun 13th, 2018 02:56 PM   Edit   Profile  

I wrote it that way based on the intent of how the variable low-pass filter works in 99.9% of all electric guitars in the universe :o)

(This message was last edited by Peegoo at 04:58 PM, Jun 13th, 2018)

juliocesar

USA/ Miami, Florida

Jun 14th, 2018 03:08 AM   Edit   Profile  

Thank you both for your answers.

I understood your point, Peegoo, re the capacitor and what it ultimately effects: and, for me, this is good to know. I picked a dark one and it is good to know that having things at 10 "effectively (or somewheres near)" frees the pup.

I was under the impression that the capacitor had an effect on the general sound of the guitar, like a blanket... I now understand that the capacitor only acts on the sound via the tone controls. This puts things into better perspective and my question becomes unnecessary: understanding how things work answers it.

Well, I do have two more questions/ uncertainties that I ran into yesterday as I put everything together. I noticed that there are several ways to ground a trem claw; I ended up grounding the claw directly to a screw at the bottom of the body cavity: a) is this fine? Also, the video I learned from didn't run a chain ground of the 3 pots... it seemed to be an oversight but there was some confusion in explaining whether it is necessary or not: b) do I need to do this, also (chain ground the 3 pots)?

Thanks again all who contribute...

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
*

Ooo that sandwich

is gonna get et
Jun 14th, 2018 06:05 AM   Edit   Profile  

Q1--As long as you have a ground wire running from a common ground point on the pots to the screw where the vibrato claw is grounded--it's good.

Q2--Many circuits have pots affixed to a pickguard that has an aluminum foil backing as shielding. This metal backing serves as the common ground connection for the pots, so there's no need to chain them with a ground wire. If no metal backing, you need to chain them together.

However, you're not creating any problems by adding a ground chain along with the metal backing.

Some people believe that having multiple ground paths will create a ground loop, and this can lead to noise in the circuit. This ground loop argument is valid--but only in powered circuits like an amp chassis, where differing voltages exist in separate sections of the circuit that can create differences in ground potential. This difference creates current flow between grounds and that adds noise to the signal.

In a passive guitar circuit though, the voltages, current and impedances are so low that ground loops are not a factor. Remember too that the signal is fed through a single conductor and single ground via the guitar's output jack.

Pinetree
Moderator Emeritus
(with many stars)

NW Pennsylvania

Jun 14th, 2018 06:31 AM   Edit   Profile  

In addition to the excellent advice above, if you don't have any unwanted noise then you're good.




juliocesar

USA/ Miami, Florida

Jun 15th, 2018 01:41 AM   Edit   Profile  

Okay.... thank you, both.

Peegoo (re the need for any more grounding in my particular situation): I currently have the trem claw connected via a wire to a screw at the bottom of the body/ electronics cavity. If I have so far understood correctly, this is not enough; I must now run a second wire from the screw to, say, the volume pot in order to achieve "ground". Am I correct in how I've understood this?

Again, thanks very much.

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Jun 15th, 2018 03:27 AM   Edit   Profile  

The short answer is yes, but it depends on whether or not the pickup/control cavity is shielded, and *how* it's shielded.

Sorry if this just leads to more questions for you but... you need continuity from the cavity bottom to the rest of the ground(s) for that to work.

It's probably easiest to just add the wire, or run the wire directly from the claw to the back of a pot (or where ever you've made your common ground point) that way you're covered and don't need to worry about the shielding stuff (for now at least ;^)


Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
*

Ooo that sandwich

is gonna get et
Jun 15th, 2018 08:48 AM   Edit   Profile  

Correct.

How it's shielded matters here. If it's black shielding paint in the cavities, I don't trust it because it usually exhibits high impedance. A direct connection (via a wire to the common ground point) is best.

If the cavities have metal (copper or aluminum) shielding, then that is sufficient because it is low impedance.

juliocesar

USA/ Miami, Florida

Jun 16th, 2018 01:18 AM   Edit   Profile  

Thanks, again...

I do not have any metallic shielding; I imagine the likelihood is I do have the black shielding paint (otherwise the screw would not be down there; the guitar is stock). It then appears that my better bet is, as both of you mentioned, to additionally wire from screw to common ground (pot) or just make the trem claw wire run to common ground in the first place.

Makes me wonder why the screw at bottom of body cavity is there if it is not (as) reliable as other methods. Interestingly, the area where the body cavity screw is found has the paint all around it (in the size of a small square) removed... wouldn't that defeat its purpose?

Thanks again to everyone who contributed. This will likely be my last entry in this thread as everything is squared away... I went from zero to hero thanks to a lot of kind clarifications from all of ya'll.

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Jun 16th, 2018 02:05 AM   Edit   Profile  

"This will likely be my last entry in this thread as everything is squared away..."

That may be, but now you've started down that slippery slope of guitar mods... you'll be back... you'll be back!!! (cue sound of maniacal laughter)
Bwaaa ha ha ha ha!!!

And yes, it's very odd that the paint was removed from the spot of connection.


juliocesar

USA/ Miami, Florida

Jun 17th, 2018 02:45 AM   Edit   Profile  

Aha... ! Mr. Reid, you have well caught my apparently misspoken (miswritten) entry. Well, I did specify "in this thread"; I do intend to post again in other threads (I have one cooking now in the pup forum where I asked advice on Barden pups; those are soon to be tested and reported on once I finish here and set up the guitar). But being that I've popped into this thread again, I do stand corrected.

Re mods, I have so far tried to categorize mods in order of priority: a) is it something that will make an effective difference (i.e., not running down inconsequential rabbit holes) and, b) is it something I find aesthetically pleasing (and therefore worthwhile for me, personally)?

Starting off w/ a 1998 Deluxe American Strat made it so the only changes of consequence I wanted were switching out the Vintage Noiseless pups (which I really like the sound of, btw); as much as I dig them, I thought I'd give JBE's a try. Everything else is on par to what I feel is just right... except the neck that I may want to shave down some to an Ibanezish thinner profile, maybe (big maybe).

Now, I did do some research after my last post and found out why the paint where the ground screw is connected is chipped off: Fender did then (and still does) use the shielding paint in the body cavity and then coats it w/ the guitar's paint finish. The shielding paint is supposed to work fine even though under this coat, however, for grounding purposes, the ground screw should make direct connection w/ the shielding paint, hence the chipped area.

Thanks (again) all.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
*

Ooo that sandwich

is gonna get et
Jun 17th, 2018 08:23 AM   Edit   Profile  

That's true (good analysis). Usually they apply a little piece of tape over the shielding paint before they blast it with the clear coat, and then peel off the tape before the clear sets up.

"This will likely be my last entry..."

That's usually something you hear in a movie as the intrepid space explorer gets smaller and smaller :o)

Mike the marksman

Kansas City, MO

Jul 3rd, 2018 11:58 AM   Edit   Profile  

In regards to solder I would recommend 63/37 over 60/40.. 63/37 has a lower melting point and goes from liquid to solid instantly, so you don't have that annoying in-between "plastic state" where you can end up with a disturbed solder joint. It's sooooo much easier to work with, especially for a beginner.

I work in aerospace manufacturing and it's all we use. I see no reason to use 60/40 when 63/37 is available.

Achase4u
Contributing Member
********

U.S. - Virginia

Jul 3rd, 2018 12:41 PM   Edit   Profile  

"In regards to solder I would recommend 63/37 over 60/40.. 63/37 has a lower melting point and goes from liquid to solid instantly, so you don't have that annoying in-between "plastic state" where you can end up with a disturbed solder joint. It's sooooo much easier to work with, especially for a beginner.

I work in aerospace manufacturing and it's all we use. I see no reason to use 60/40 when 63/37 is available."

I've been on a bit of a Kester 63/37 kick myself the last year or two. I was looking into solders for building recording equipment including the no clean kind. I do like how the 63/37 works.

Previous 20 Messages  

FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / re advice w/ first time soldering (pickups/ pots)




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2018 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved