FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

Advertise here

Musician's Friend

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

Antique Electronics Supply

Apex Tube Matching

Sweetwater

Guitar Center

WD Music

MOD KITS DIY

Jensen Loudspeakers

Amplified Parts


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / The Chop Shop / Anybody have a good version of Bach Prelude in C Major?

Blacksunshine
Contributing Member
**********
**********
*****

Houston

Jun 15th, 2018 03:43 PM   Edit   Profile  

I found a few versions written for guitar, but they all seem to lack that special something.

Admittedly it's hard to translate to guitar, and sounds a thousand times better on piano as it was written for, but it's a nice piece and I think it would be worth learning to approximate it.

Any thoughts?

Gracias

(This message was last edited by Blacksunshine at 05:44 PM, Jun 15th, 2018)

Achase4u

U.S. - Virginia

Jun 15th, 2018 08:04 PM   Edit   Profile  

I would say with that particular piece, just play it from the grand staff. The F clef notes are sparse enough that you could quickly learn them (or just mark the note name in the score) and memorize them. Then you are left with the G clef(right hand piano) notes to read. Remember to transpose an octave for guitar, or play in another octave that works better.

I've never tried this one, but I imagine you'll have to break up some of those chords physically and not be able to play all the ties on the bass notes, but thats ok.

Or, get a recorder out of some kind and use two guitars. One bass clef and one treble to make up the song on a recording. That would be neat especially at the end during that "run".

Another option - use the original score and write your own guitar version in notation. You'll come to understand the piece at a deeper level that way than just playing it, believe it or not.

(This message was last edited by Achase4u at 10:08 PM, Jun 15th, 2018)

Blacksunshine
Contributing Member
**********
**********
*****

Houston

Jun 15th, 2018 08:08 PM   Edit   Profile  

Yeah I'm working on a version right now, and of course it's an octave down.

I've seen a couple arrangements, one has you detune the low E down to D, and another plays it in standard tuning.

The version I'm working on is in standard tuning, but a few of the chords are VERY awkward.

:-/

Blacksunshine
Contributing Member
**********
**********
*****

Houston

Jun 15th, 2018 08:11 PM   Edit   Profile  

"use the original score and write your own guitar version in notation. You'll come to understand the piece at a deeper level that way than just playing it, believe it or not."


I'm probably going to do kind of that, but take parts of a couple different versions and make it work for me.

I like this piece, it's one of those that sounds easy until you actually try it!

;-)

Achase4u

U.S. - Virginia

Jun 15th, 2018 09:33 PM   Edit   Profile  

"The version I'm working on is in standard tuning, but a few of the chords are VERY awkward."

This is why it's no fun to play something written for keys on guitar. Once in a while you can play those stacked thirds if it's in the right octave and on the right string set, but trying to do that everywhere on the neck is torture(though Johnny Smith somehow made a career of it).

Try breaking the difficult chords up instead of playing them as a chord. Try them as a line, moving fingers instead of pinning them. Yea, it'll change the sound without sustaining each note, but it also may open the door to some more unique ornamentation or embellishment that you otherwise wouldn't hear on the piano version... may as well change it up a little. It's been played a zillion times as written, maybe change it a little in some ways.

(This message was last edited by Achase4u at 11:35 PM, Jun 15th, 2018)

FDP Forum / The Chop Shop / Anybody have a good version of Bach Prelude in C Major?




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2018 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved