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FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / Diagnosing a guitar wiring issue

Purple Valley
Contributing Member
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USA

Jul 12th, 2018 10:39 PM   Edit   Profile  

I've got a meter on hand, and theoretically know how to follow the chain to figure the weak link, but I'm hoping some of you guys can help me cut to the chase. I don't have much experience with wiring issues.

It's my Carvin solidbody, with 2 humbuckers, 1 volume, 1 tone and 2 coil-split mini-switches.

I opened it up, and can't see anything obvious. But plugged in I can (by shaking it or knocking it around) get it to do any one of three things: go totally silent (all positions), hum like the cord's been pulled out (all positions), or play fine on bridge position, but low signal on neck and mixed positions.

Makes me guess it's either the neck pup, or one of the switches.

Any help on narrowing it down will be much appreciated.

(This message was last edited by Purple Valley at 12:43 AM, Jul 13th, 2018)

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Jul 12th, 2018 11:10 PM   Edit   Profile  

Not that it matters, but what model is it?

Have you tried checking all the grounds for continuity?

That would be my first step.

Purple Valley
Contributing Member
**********
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USA

Jul 12th, 2018 11:32 PM   Edit   Profile  

It's a DC127 solid koa neck-thru, about 1998 vintage.

Thanks for the tip, Mick.

Now, I have to look up what it means!

Purple Valley
Contributing Member
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USA

Jul 12th, 2018 11:39 PM   Edit   Profile  

I found a good diagnosing guide on the Seymour Duncan site. I assume that will get me through. I was just hoping there might be something obvious from the symptoms I described.

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Jul 13th, 2018 12:24 AM   Edit   Profile  

I also found this:

KIT 40 DC127

bottom left of page 1

Purple Valley
Contributing Member
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USA

Jul 13th, 2018 12:32 AM   Edit   Profile  

Thanks a lot, Mick.

I didn't even think to look up the Carvin diagram.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Ooo that sandwich

is gonna get et
Jul 13th, 2018 02:46 AM   Edit   Profile  

One of the things that can kick your butt (because it's not always obvious) is solder connections on the pots/switches/jack coming into contact with cavity shielding.

Make sure all signal-carrying wires have no way of contacting shielding and ground wires. Ensure all components are tightly attached and cannot move or rotate.

Another one that can make you nuts is uninsulated braided-shield pickup leads, a la Gibson. If that wire falls across the back of a pot or switch, the braided shielding can make contact with a signal connection and kill the signal.

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Jul 13th, 2018 05:27 AM   Edit   Profile  

Good advice from P!

- as always :^)

(This message was last edited by Mick Reid at 07:28 AM, Jul 13th, 2018)

Purple Valley
Contributing Member
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USA

Jul 13th, 2018 09:44 AM   Edit   Profile  

Thanks, 'goo. Hopefully, I'll get some time to get at it this weekend.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Ooo that sandwich

is gonna get et
Jul 13th, 2018 10:09 AM   Edit   Profile  

If you run into a jam, post a gut-shot pic and we can assist.

The most difficult problems to diagnose are the ones that are intermittent. They're like ghosts.

wrnchbndr
Contributing Member
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New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
Aug 16th, 2018 07:26 AM   Edit   Profile  

Verify your output cable first with another guitar. Then proceed using a wooden or plastic chopstick. Sometimes its valuable to employ a small electric motor that can run continuously to generate a signal for a pickup while you're poking around.

Bubbalou
Contributing Member
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USA

THE LOW END OF UPPER TEJAS
Aug 20th, 2018 06:02 PM   Edit   Profile  

“Sometimes its valuable to employ a small electric motor that can run continuously to generate a signal for a pickup while you're poking around.”

I use my Quartz watch. It is an electromechanical watch (partial mechanical /Quartz electronic that pulses a coil each second to ratchet a second hand gear. )You get a nice Tic Tic Tic sound when it is near the pickup

(This message was last edited by Bubbalou at 08:03 PM, Aug 20th, 2018)

FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / Diagnosing a guitar wiring issue




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