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FDP Forum / The Chop Shop / What makes this chord change work?

langford
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Toronto, Canada

Jun 18th, 2019 01:15 PM   Edit   Profile  

There's a sweet little cadence that I often associate with early Beatle songs where you go from a I chord to what would be a IV chord, except that you play a minor 7th version of that chord instead. So, say you're playing a F as the I chord. Your next chord would be a Bbm7.

What you call this? It's not a modulation of the key centre as far as I can tell (I can't think of a diatonic scale that has both an F major and a Bbm7.) Does the Bbm7 function as another kind of chord? Or is a borrowed chord that works simply because it sounds good?

Theory gurus: Help me.

(This message was last edited by langford at 03:58 PM, Jun 18th, 2019)

Achase4u
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Jun 18th, 2019 01:38 PM   Edit   Profile  

Interesting question. I've never really thought of that minor IV as anything other than a minor IV. I know against the I chord, the b3 of the IV is the #5 so you get an altered sound in the key. Often this change comes after a major IV sound, so you get the chromatic walkdown happening. In your example Bb maj, the natural third is D, then it changes to minor which gives us Db or C#, then if we resolve to F we get a C natural.

There are probably more complex ways of looking at this like we see in the link but in most music I think of it pretty simply so I don't get slowed down too much(a problem of mine)


A lot of info on the subject here

langford
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Toronto, Canada

Jun 18th, 2019 03:41 PM   Edit   Profile  

Thanks for the link, Achase4u. Interesting stuff. And yes, if you go from major IV to IVm7, it makes a passing chord walking back to I. On it's own, it has a kind of suspended sound (at least to my ear). Maybe that's because it's sort of functioning as a passing chord, but with the less context. It feels suspend because it's pulling toward the IV and I and the same time, but without other clues as to where it's headed.

Peegoo
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Planet Peegoo

Rhythm & Lewd Guitarist
Jun 18th, 2019 08:36 PM   Edit   Profile  

There are lots of uses of the ivm7 but they commonly follow a IVM7 chord. Also, what the melody is doing bears on the harmonic movement within the chords.

Te 52

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Jun 18th, 2019 10:32 PM   Edit   Profile  

It's called a "borrowed chord," i.e., a color chord borrowed from the parallel minor key. The practice has been around since the Baroque period.

If your major key is F, the parallel minor key is F minor, and the iv7 chord in F minor is indeed a Bbm7.

In the linked discussion, see the second group in the section marked "Common borrowed chords."

Borrowed Chords

(This message was last edited by Te 52 at 12:34 AM, Jun 19th, 2019)

langford
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Toronto, Canada

Jun 19th, 2019 07:52 AM   Edit   Profile  

Thank you, Te! I did not know that "borrowed chord" had such a specific definition. I'm going to experiment with that.

FDP Forum / The Chop Shop / What makes this chord change work?




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