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FDP Forum / The Chop Shop / I am fascinated...

ninworks
Contributing Member
*******

Middle Tennessee

Guitar Slave
Aug 25th, 2019 05:33 PM   Edit   Profile  

....at the way repetitious patterns keep appearing on a fingerboard. Anytime I stumble across a new one I have to log it in my guitar practicing software so I don't forget it.

What I once thought was so incredibly complicated really isn't. All it takes is the time to find them. For the repetitious patterns to be as simple as many of them have turned out to be, making music while executing them is a whole other story. Making the fingers follow those patterns is a mental and physical exercise second to none. Anytime I find a new one I tend to beat on it until I do it long enough to make it stick in my mechanics. Even then, when I go back to it days later, the fingerboard and picking dragons eat my lunch. After I do it for awhile it comes back. Every time I come back to it I get it back a little quicker than the last time. I suppose it may have something to do with getting older. My mechanical recall isn't as fast as it used to be. Maybe it's because I am a lot more focused on getting it absolutely right than I was in my younger years. I dunno...

(This message was last edited by ninworks at 07:39 PM, Aug 25th, 2019)

Achase4u
Contributing Member
*********

U.S. - Virginia

Aug 25th, 2019 06:29 PM   Edit   Profile  

Very interesting you use the word "mechanics".

You may not be inclined, but there are a few great books by the genius George Van Eps called "Harmonic Mechanisms for guitar".

It's heavy stuff. Patterns are all over the place and I think that's part of hacking the guitar.

Howard Roberts has many visual patterns drawn out in his "compendium" books as well.

It's tough. I usually have to spend a good 30 minutes on one or two patterns working them up from slow to fast with the met. Do that every day for a while, then move on.

Unfortunately, we can't be good at everything at once on the guitar. Things move in and out of our hands and minds. Practice has to be cycled I guess. It never ends. I'm noticing how I don't pick things up or retain them as I used to. Simple neuro-plasticity in the brain is all. Its the most malleable at birth and declines as time goes on. The more we use it with difficult tasks like guitar practice, the better. Think of that, practicing guitar just isn't good for guitar, it's good for all of life!

ninworks
Contributing Member
*******

Middle Tennessee

Guitar Slave
Aug 25th, 2019 06:43 PM   Edit   Profile  

"Very interesting you use the word "mechanics"."

Yeah, that wasn't an accident. That's exactly what I meant. :o)

I always have technical stuff that I'm currently working on. I try to keep about 5 or 6 of them going at the same time. I usually start out with ones I have gotten under my fingers, for the most part, then I delve into the ones I'm not so good at. Some of the exercises I made up to work on these things will take me 30 minutes to an hour to play all the way through them when playing them in many different keys. I don't always play all the way through them in all the keys. I have found out that if I practice them in only a key or two it will give me grief when trying to do them in a key, or keys, I haven't practiced them in. Even if all the fingering and picking motions are identical. The difference in fret spacing is just enough to screw with me.

If I have numerous things to work on I can switch to another one if I start getting fatigued playing the same thing over and over and over. Many times just changing what I'm doing will do away with the fatigue. If it doesn't I'll stop for a few minutes and come back to it.

Once a week or two I'll do a review over some things that I had down when I put them away.

Playing a lot is also good for my arthritis. Especially in my fretting hand. I think it helps keep things well-lubricated.

(This message was last edited by ninworks at 08:48 PM, Aug 25th, 2019)

Achase4u
Contributing Member
*********

U.S. - Virginia

Aug 25th, 2019 06:56 PM   Edit   Profile  

"Even if all the fingering and picking motions are identical. The difference in fret spacing is just enough to screw with me."

Agreed. This is a common misconception with horn/piano players. They are right to a degree that yes we can just move a fret or two and keep the same shapes, but it isn't that easy. There are changes to be made to go down or up a register if you run out of fretboard in either direction, and the fret spacing, dots and every part of the neck is subtly unique to the mind/eyes/hands so it isn't always easy. Some things are but, not most. Nothing worth playing, anyway :-).

ninworks
Contributing Member
*******

Middle Tennessee

Guitar Slave
Aug 27th, 2019 07:07 PM   Edit   Profile  

I have been working on cycled arpeggio patterns across the fingerboard. Every other string repeats the same pattern. All that has to be done is move up or down the fingerboard 1 or 2 frets and it starts all over.

I found a picking pattern that fits into the shapes well. I've been doing Maj 7th, minor 7th, half dim 7th, b7th, sus4Maj 7th, and sus4b7th arpeggios. I plan on stretching them out to cover many more before I'm done. The extended chord arps will be a challenge but well worth the effort. It's something I should have done decades ago but just never did.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
****

If irritation occurs

discontinue use.
Aug 27th, 2019 07:27 PM   Edit   Profile  

I worked through Mickey Baker's book a few years ago, and his approach was very similar: learning patterns of chord tones and scales across the fretboard reinforces the shapes and quickly gets the stuff from the brain to the fingers.

The one drawback I encountered was I started to go on autopilot when playing a solo, and it was obvious the patterns from the exercises were working their way into my soloing. So I incorporated things like string skipping and less scalar-sounding note sequences.

There is still so much to learn.

Achase4u
Contributing Member
*********

U.S. - Virginia

Aug 27th, 2019 11:21 PM   Edit   Profile  

Yea. It's like you have to drill that stuff til it can come out when you want it, but control it somehow so it doesn't just sound like exercises when you play.

That's some next level stuff to overcome.

There is really just so much to learn. Oy.

FDP Forum / The Chop Shop / I am fascinated...




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