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FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / Ken Burns Country Music got me thinking

littleuch
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Florida

Sep 19th, 2019 06:19 AM   Edit   Profile  

You so often hear people proclaim their dislike for "New Country" and all its variants, singling out "Old Country" as the revered national treasure. So it makes me wonder; did the genre exhaust itself? Have all the "good songs" been written? I mean, I was walking around the house amusing myself with a high and lonesome V to I transition "hook" while mind-singing "This world won't miss me when I'm gawwwn". Hank sure had some excruciating subject matters that obviously resonated with the masses. But how would "good 'ol fashion country music" issued today play out with the market? Seems to me it would be scoffed at as nothing more than a (name your old time artist) wannabe. Is there really anything left in-between in the way the pioneers may have mixed regional music to come up with say, Texas Swing? Or is "Hick-Hop" as good as we get?

When people bemoan how music has changed, is there not a bigger part of that equation? People have changed and thus, their appetites.

ECS-3
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USA / Virginia

Sep 19th, 2019 06:34 AM   Edit   Profile  

I think people change and the music changes with it. It's not just country music, I'll bet James Jamerson couldn't hardly find work these day unless he learned how to snap and pop strings, and play a 5 string bass.

rythmpyg
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Wisconsin, USA

you'll thank me in the end
Sep 19th, 2019 07:33 AM   Edit   Profile  

Listen to Marty Stuart's new stuff (since the 2000's), he doesn't let it go, thankfully.

BbendFender
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American Patriot

About as ordinary as you can get.
Sep 19th, 2019 07:40 AM   Edit   Profile  

I still like the older stuff and my band plays the older stuff. Our songs are mostly 50's - 70's pure country. Our audiences like it that way.

Scott L.
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Memphis

Mr. Crump don't 'low no easyriders here.
Sep 19th, 2019 08:03 AM   Edit   Profile  

+1 for Marty Stuart. The man is an archivist, a traditionalist, a rocker and keeps the twang alive. Burns was smart to seek him out for his documentary.

Taildragger
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USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
Sep 19th, 2019 09:11 AM   Edit   Profile  

"I think people change and the music changes with it."


"Stand by your man who self-identifies as a woman..."

---Tommy Wynette

BrentD
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Michigan

Sep 19th, 2019 09:25 AM   Edit   Profile  

^ Lol!

I think older country music was more distinct from other genres. Newer stuff blends a little more with other styles and in 1970 would probably have been considered pop or rock.

I don't listen to modern country but was in a band that covered some of it. I was continually amazed at the number of hit songs with two chords. One of them was only one chord.

Timmer
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Shreveport, LA

There I was one night...
Sep 19th, 2019 11:11 AM   Edit   Profile  


Old timey country just doesn't resonate today. It's a museum piece relegated to a black and white documentary. A curiosity like most of our old songs from the 60's and 70's. It's counter culture or maybe better sub-culture. Whatever it is, it is below the surface. Only found live in some back alley speak-easy, catering to the geriatric crowd, and wedged next door the the avant guard jazz place where people go in pretending like they "dig it man", but are really posing and dreaming of stepping outside to take their next vap hit.

I think it was Peegs who posted the link to Waites' "What is he building in there". That's what old time country is - something strange and other worldly - to be viewed with both suspicion and bemusement. Ah, the good old days. Let's reminisce while we tighten the velcro on our depends.

That is what I'm thinking.

Note: I almost never pick up my guitar without playing Mama Tried.

5Strats
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Edmond/OKC

GospelBilly!
Sep 19th, 2019 11:24 AM   Edit   Profile  

There’s lots of good traditional style country artists around these days: Margo Price, Tyler Childers, Nikki Lane, Billy Strings, Chris Stapleton, Turnpike Trubadors, just to name some of them.

While not new, there’s also Steve Earle, Shooter Jennings, Old Crow Medicine Show, Dwight Yoakum, Marty Stuart, Lucinda Williams and Dale Watson, et al.

Nawlins Dawg
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N.O.,LA USA

There's no place like tone
Sep 19th, 2019 01:14 PM   Edit   Profile  

“But how would “good ol’ fashioned country music” issued today play out with the market?”

I think there’d be a market for it, but a very small one at best. The good news, I believe, is that artists who produce an honest, quality product (see 5’s list) can find an audience and operate at a level that allows them to do enough business to keep the doors open.

larryguitar19
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South Florida

larryguitar
Sep 19th, 2019 01:37 PM   Edit   Profile  

I think they had to decide what comes under the heading of "country" and go with it.

For example they suggest that it started with the old fiddle banjo tunes and then evolved into Hank Williams to Patsy Cline and so on.

But that's a bit misleading. The source material remains alive and distinct. For example there is still a line that goes from the Monroe Brothers to Bryan Sutton today. And there are people who still play in the style of Dock Boggs.

But we all understand it just doesn't sell like it did back in the day.

The Ken Burns series looks at things in the context of how Billboard would put things in boxes.

(This message was last edited by larryguitar19 at 05:45 PM, Sep 19th, 2019)

HenryJ
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Bogue Falaya River

is STILL dark and cold.
Sep 20th, 2019 06:01 AM   Edit   Profile  

Rock has evolved from Elvis to Chubby Checker to surf to British Invasion to psychedelia to jazz-rock to jam bands to sensitive singer-songwriter to punk/new wave, etc. and, while one may not like whatever is the latest form, no one bemoans the fact that rock has evolved over the years.

A lot of country fans seem to complain about the fact that their genre has also evolved. Hey, all genre evolve.


hushnel
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North Florida

A Friend of Bill W.
Sep 20th, 2019 09:48 AM   Edit   Profile  

The world changed, the only always contemporary theme is the love songs.

I didn’t grow up exposed to country music, I did get into folk style music later on as a spin off of R&R. I followed that in reverse to see where is was coming from. Arlo led me too Woody etc. The songs are about universal human emotions, and experiences.

I thing Willie Nelson wrote some of the best songs ever written in these genres. Billy Joe Shaver has tunes that resonate with me too.

A lot of this stuff was written from shared experiences as the newer generations become the target demographic the older stuff gets pushed back. It’ll never go away. My music appreciation is much wider today than it was when I was in my 20s.

larryguitar19
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South Florida

larryguitar
Sep 20th, 2019 10:07 AM   Edit   Profile  

I grew up a military brat. One thing about that is you cannot escape being exposed to all of it. The jukebox was not segregated at all.

In any 15 minute span you heard George Jones, Aretha and the Beatles interchangeably.

And I'm not saying there wasn't the occasional riot that broke out over whether "Country Roads" was really a country song.



BbendFender
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American Patriot

About as ordinary as you can get.
Sep 20th, 2019 12:05 PM   Edit   Profile  

I also think today's new country music calls for a cowboy streaker, a Rebel yell and everyone get as drunk as fast as you can. Turn it all up, everybody sing and lots of fuzz. It's Yeehaa stuff and I'm not crazy about it at all.

FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / Ken Burns Country Music got me thinking




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